Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius)
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Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) a pest of cotton in the southwestern United States by George D. Butler

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Cotton -- Diseases and pests -- Southwestern States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement[G.D. Butler, Jr. and T.J. Henneberry].
SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 1707., Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 1707.
ContributionsHenneberry, T. J.
The Physical Object
Pagination19 p. ;
Number of Pages19
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16032840M

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from book The Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) Interaction with Geminivirus-Infected Host Plants: Bemisia tabaci, Host Plants and Geminiviruses (pp) Management of Bemisia.   Bemisia tabaci (Gennedius) has distinguished itself from the more than 1, whitefly species in the world by its adaptability, persistence and potential to damage a wide range of agricultural and horticultural crops in all six of the world’s inhabited continents. B. tabaci inflicts plant damage through direct feeding, inducement of plant disorders, vectoring of plant viruses and excretion. The whitefly Bemisia tabaci—pest and vector status Nomenclature and host range. The genus Bemisia comprises 37 species and originated in Asia (Mound & Halsey ). B. tabaci was first described by Gennadius on poinsettia plants in as Aleyrodes tabaci and it was described under numerous names before its morphologic variability was Cited by: 4. Get this from a library! The Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera.. [Winston M O Thompson] -- This book presents a chronology of events of B. tabaci and geminiviruses, and an overview within the Caribbean and Latin America. The pathosystems involving Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, Cotton leaf.

rows  Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature Top of page. The genus Bemisia contains 37 .   This book reviews interagency research and development of classical (importation) biological control of Bemisia tabaci (biotype B) conducted in the USA from The successful discovery, evaluation, release, and establishment of at least five exotic B. tabaci natural enemies in rapid response to the devastating infestations in the USA represents a landmark in interagency cooperation. Bemisia tabaci (Gennedius) has distinguished itself from the more than whitefly species in the world by it adaptability, persistence and potential to damage a wide range of agricultural and horticultural crops in all six of the world’s inhabited continents.B. tabaci inflicts plant damage through direct feeding, inducement of plant disorders, vectoring of plant viruses and excretion of. This book will be of value to researchers in the biological and agricultural sciences, graduate students and corporations linked to the agricultural industry. Bemisia tabaci is among the most destructive of the vectors. The developments over the past two decades as these relate to B. tabaci and transmitted geminiviruses are highlighted. The File Size: 5MB.

(Bemisia = sweetpotato whitefly B biotype, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), or silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring). Photograph by James Castner, University of Florida. The first nymphal instar is capable of limited movement and is called the crawler. Bemisia tabaci, silverleaf whitefly, is a pest of many agricultural and ornamental crops. Trialeurodes vaporariorum, greenhouse whitefly, a major pest of greenhouse fruit, vegetables, and ornamentals; Although several species of whitefly may cause some crop losses simply by sucking sap when they are very numerous, the major harm they do is Class: Insecta. Bemisia tabaci is a serious cosmopolitan pest of many crops, including cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and vegetables. It causes three kinds of damage: (1) direct damage through piercing and sucking sap from plant foliage, (2) indirect damage caused by the accumulation of honeydew produced by B. tabaci which leads to mold growth on foliage, and (3. Bemisia tabaci stands out as the most important member of the family Aleyrodidae for its grave impact on tropical and subtropical agriculture. Eggs of B. tabaci are usually laid on the lower surface of leaves. After hatching, the minute first-instar nymphs crawl actively in search of suitable sites for settling down.